Looking for a way out of the day job and into the exciting adventures of being a solopreneur?

Having your own business – what’s not to love? No boss breathing down your neck. No grotty commute in the dark.

Pyjamas instead of a suit? Or is that just me?

In today’s world, there are tons of possibilities for starting your own business from your home – the majority of which don’t need much capital to get going.

I have given you the low-down on the pros and cons of a ton of ideas, so you can assess which of these 67 (!) ideas might be up your entrepreneurial street!

Today’s entrepreneur doesn’t need to invent a physical product or supply a service locally to start their own business. There are a plethora of potential business ideas that you can start with a decent computer and a reasonable internet connection.

Whilst many of these jobs involve solely working online, you may be able to expand your business by offering some of your services in your local area.

67 Home Business Ideas You Can Start Today

1. Start a Copywriting Business

home-business-copywriting

Look around you and notice how much text you see. A cereal box, a guide for the remote control, adverts on Google, the political party leaflet you received through the door this morning. They’ve all been written by copywriters. If you have a way with words and you think you can write informatively or persuasively, this is one to consider.

Pros

  • The demand for copywriters is high, which means a lot of potential clients for you!
  • You don’t need any specific qualifications and the start-up costs are minimal.

Cons

  • There is a lot of competition from writers who will accept very low payments (although, if you’re a good writer with a niche and some great marketing, you can bank).

2. Work as a Freelance Social Media Manager

Always getting likes and shares on social media? Don’t you feel great about it? How about channeling your skills into helping companies develop their online social media strategies and grow their businesses?

Pros

  • There is loads of cool software available to help you do your job well (Hootsuite is awesome!) which will help you schedule future posts, so you can be flexible about when you work.
  • It’s a challenging field that’s constantly changing – perfect if you’re someone who loves to keep learning.

Cons

  • You may have to work for free or low pay to begin with to build up a hot portfolio.
  • It can be difficult to come up with creative ideas when you’re tired, so you’ll need to consider when you’ll be able to do your best work.

3. Start a Proof-Reading Business

A business idea for those of us that can’t help noticing all those tiny grammar and spelling mistakes on our Facebook friends’ posts. Channel your eye for detail into something productive.

Pros

  • Proof-readers are needed in every industry – business, academia, medicine, law, etc.
  • If you specialise in a sought-after subject, such as science, you will be more in demand and be able to secure better-paying clients. This is especially the case if you have a higher degree like a master’s or PhD.

Cons

  • There are lots of big companies offering rock-bottom price proof-reading, so you will need to market yourself well to get ahead.

4. Become a Fiction Writer

Fiction writing isn’t just about writing a killer novel. You can also write short stories, poetry, and fiction for children.

Pros

  • The set-up costs are low – all you need is a great imagination, a penchant for the written word and a computer.

Cons

  • You need a lot of self-motivation and the resilience to cope with days when you get writer’s block.
  • Given the competition, it can be challenging to get your books and other works noticed by publishers. Many writers have to have a day job on the side, at least at some points during their career.

 

5. Become an Online English Teacher

home-business-english-teacher

English truly is a global language, and the demand around the world for English teachers has not stopped growing. If you have a good command of the English language and you enjoy helping others learn, there are plenty of opportunities available for you to teach English.

Pros

  • You get to connect with people all over the world.
  • You don’t need any certification (although a degree and a qualification like Trinity or TESOL will help you get more students and ultimately, more money).

Cons

  • If you live in the UK (or another expensive country), it can be difficult to compete with English teachers living in cheaper countries like Vietnam and Mexico.

 

6. Start an E-Commerce Business

Sell, sell, sell! And you can do it all on platforms like eBay, Amazon Marketplace, and Shopify. You can sell anything from handmade items and vintage toys to vegan makeup and zero waste kitchen products. The world (wide web) really is your oyster.

Pros

  • You have a serious amount of choices in terms of what you sell.
  • You can use analytics tools to find out what types of products are popular at the moment.

Cons

  • It can be difficult to find a market that is not saturated already, so you’ll need to do a hefty amount of market research.

7. Become a Meal Planner

home-business-meal-planner

Plenty of people want to eat healthily but they struggle with meal planning and they don’t want to shell out loads of cash for the hipster version of meals on wheels. Know what needs to go in a healthy, balanced diet? Why not help out those who don’t? (And make some tasty income while you’re at it).

Pros

  • You will be making a difference in people’s lives by making them healthier and happier.

Cons

  • You may have to get a qualification or training in nutrition to secure better-paying clients.

8. Become an Online Stock Trader

Stock traders buy and sell stocks and shares, bonds, currencies and other financial products to make a profit. If you’re astute and open to high risk, high reward venture, stock trading could be worth looking into.

Pros

  • You could make a serious amount of money if you’re successful.
  • There is the potential to have a delightfully flexible lifestyle if you start making lots from trading.

Cons

  • You are putting yourself at considerable financial risk, so you need to be sure you know what you’re doing!

9. Start Your Own Blog

Nearly 5 million blog posts are published online every day. Staggering! The richest bloggers in the world earn millions. You might not become a millionaire from blogging (although, fingers crossed!) but it’s certainly a viable business idea.

Pros

  • You can make extra money (and gain exposure) by writing guest posts for other blogs, so you don’t have to rely on your own blog gaining traction before you start earning.

Cons

  • You’ll be unsurprised to learn that blogging is a hugely competitive area, so you will need to find a niche and work hard to build a following before making money from your own blog.

10. Become a Freelance Voiceover Artist

Plenty of businesses, small and large, need voiceovers for projects – things like training videos, advertisements, YouTube videos, and meditation instructions. They tend to look for people with clear voices and (usually) neutral accents.

Pros

  • Voiceover artists work on a huge variety of projects, so the work is never boring!

Cons

  • Your audio quality will need to be spot on, which may require you to set up a home studio with soundproofing and a high-quality microphone. This could be a little on the costly side.
  • It’s pretty hard to work if you have a cold or lose your voice – unless you have a very specific brief to sound ill!

11. Sell Your Advice

Are you the friend that everyone always comes to for advice? Plenty of people online are looking for someone to help them solve their problems. It might sound a bit ‘out there’, but if you’re good at it and get glowing reviews from your helpees, you could make money as a modern-day Agony Aunt.

Pros

  • If you’re a people person who likes to solve problems, this could be the perfect way out of a day job you don’t like.
  • You don’t need any specific qualifications.

Cons

  • If you don’t have any specific qualifications, you will struggle to charge higher prices until you build up a good reputation.

 

12. Start a Business Helping People with their Tax Returns

There are two types of self-employed people. Those who are good with numbers and can knock out their tax return in just a few hours. And there are those who want to cry and hide behind the settee when it comes to trying to get their heads around the numbers. These are the people that need your help!

Pros

  • The number of people becoming self-employed or starting small businesses is increasing, which means your market is increasing.
  • Not everyone can afford the high fees of an accountant, which leaves space for the little guy (you!).

Cons

  • You may need to get some accounting qualifications if you want to charge higher rates, as you will be competing with fully qualified accountants.

13. Become a Virtual Assistant (VA)

There are plenty of professionals out there who need a Personal Assistant (PA) on a casual, part-time or temporary basis. This is where VAs come in. Work online and provide these services for a whole bunch of different clients. Exciting!

Pros

  • Unlike being a contracted PA, you can choose who you work with.
  • You don’t need any particular knowledge or qualifications, although experience working in a business would be helpful.

Cons

  • Until you build up a good reputation, the pay can be on the low side as you may be competing with workers in countries with lower rates of pay, such as India and the Philippines.

14. Start a Business in Freelance Data Entry

One of the most well-known work-from-home jobs. This is great if you have an eye for detail and you’re looking for something fairly stress-free.

Pros

  • Data entry is high volume work which means lots of potential clients.
  • If you specialise in a particular field, like medicine or law, you can work with higher-paying clients.

Cons

  • The pay tends to be on the lower side.
  • There are ‘work at home’ scammers roaming the internet, so you’ll need to do your homework regarding finding reputable clients.

15. Become a Freelance Translator

Bilingual? Trilingual?! If you’re fluent in more than one language, freelance translation is a lucrative business option.

Pros

  • Translation is an interesting and challenging field with lots of opportunities to work in different specialisations.
  • You can do written or verbal translation, which opens up a range of possibilities for your business.

Cons

  •  Clients can often expect you to work to short deadlines if they need something translating urgently – which means long working days on certain projects.

16. Start Your Own Video Production Company

There’s real pleasure to be gained from capturing eye-catching footage and editing it into a piece of appealing video. And if you can make money while you’re doing it – job’s (literally) a good ‘un.

Pros

  • You have a great amount of flexibility as to the field you work in. Make videos to inform, educate, persuade or entertain. Work in entertainment, the third sector, banking, advertising, etc.

Cons

  • You need to be good at what you do. This could be a hobby for a fair while before it becomes a viable business.
  • It can be costly to get all of the equipment and software needed to get set up.

17. Become a Business Consultant

If you have experience working in business, particularly in management or HR, you could sell your services advising businesses on how to improve and grow.

Pros

  • The start-up costs are pretty low but you can stand to make a packet if you are skilled, find your niche, and develop your networks.

Cons

  • You may need to gain some certification or qualifications to improve your credibility.
  • You need to be careful about liability with regards to the advice you give. The last thing you want is to end up in court as a result of failed business advice.

18. Become a Business Trainer

Plenty of organisations hire external trainers. There are all sorts of courses that you could teach, such as health and safety at work, interpersonal skills, management skills, conflict resolution, and diversity training.

Pros

  • You could deliver training online or in-person, giving you plenty of flexibility for your business.
  • You can feel good at the end of the day knowing that you’ve made somebody’s workplace a better place to be.

Cons

  • You might need additional qualifications in a particular specialisation if you want to carve out a niche.
  • Depending on what you train (healthy and safety, for example), you might find that your participants see training as a waste of work time. So you may need to think of some ways to make ‘boring’ subjects interesting.

19. Start a Transcription Business

Got an eagle …ear? Transcribers, or transcriptionists, write up audio recordings, often from legal or medical settings. If you’re a good listener and you type at a decent speed, transcription is pretty easy to get into.

Pros

  • You can make more money if you specialise in certain areas, such as medical transcription.
  • Transcription is an in-demand service, so you should find it easy to secure regular work.

Cons

  • The pay tends to be on the lower side as there is competition from transcriptionists in countries with a lower cost of living.
  • You made some additional software and equipment, such as a decent headset and a foot pedal.

20. Start a Grant Writing Business

Charities are always looking for skilled writers to help them write bids for grants. If you can write and you want to help charities earn an income, consider grant writing.

Pros

  • You are contributing to a good cause. Give yourself a pat on the back!
  • You’ll encounter some pretty inspiring individuals.

Cons

  • You have to adhere to strict deadlines so that the charity you are writing for does not miss its funding opportunity.
  • You also need to do a lot of research into the company you’re applying to for the grant as the success rate is not overly high.

21. Become a Freelance Customer Service Operator

Some (especially smaller) companies like to hire freelance customer service representatives to deal with any questions, comments, and issues that their customers have. If you’re calm, cool, collected and know how to solve a problem or two, this could be up your street.

Pros

  • You get to talk to a lot of different people and help them to resolve issues they’re having.

Cons

  • The pay is not usually fantastic.
  • It can be stressful dealing with difficult customers on the phone if you don’t have the means to resolve their issue.

22. Become an SEO Expert

SEO stands for Search Engine Optimisation. An SEO preps websites, adverts, social media posts, and other stuff on the web to make it Google-friendly, making this stuff rank higher up on search engine pages. It’s a modern-day marketing essential for any company looking to get ahead.

Pros

  • SEOs are hugely in demand as companies compete for custom.
  • You can earn a decent sum of money when you provide SEO services.

Cons

  • SEO is a constantly changing field, so as Google and other search engines change their algorithms, you have to constantly update your knowledge. 

23. Become a Freelance Programmer

home-business-programmer

Check any freelance website, and you will find that a huge proportion of the jobs are for programmers and web designers.

Pros

  • You can get rich! Programming is where the money is. If you’re looking to make the big bucks in the long run, it’s worth putting in the time to learn how to code.

Cons

  • You probably won’t get rich quick! It can take a long time and a lot of effort to learn how to code, so if you’re impatient and want to start earning now, this business idea probably isn’t your cup of tea.

24. Start a Tutoring Business

Hey clever clogs ­– are you an expert at something? If you have a degree in a subject like maths or psychology, you could start a business tutoring students in your chosen field.

Pros

  • Tutoring online means that you can work with students all across the globe, but tutoring also gives you the flexibility to teach in-person, too.
  • You have the satisfaction of watching your students improve.

Cons

  • You are likely to need a qualification in your specific field, particularly if you want to demand higher rates of pay.

25. Start a Photography Business

home-business-photographer

Photographers are needed in all sorts of fields and industries. This is a great business opportunity if you can find a specialist niche to work in.

Pros

  • Some areas, such as wedding photography, are very lucrative.
  • The majority of your day is spent on artistic endeavours that, presumably, you enjoy doing. Winner!

Cons

  • The competition can be high, depending on the field you decide to work in.
  • It will probably cost a reasonable amount to get set up, as you’ll need a good camera with different lenses.

26. Create Online Courses

If you have a lot of knowledge in a particular subject, you could make money by creating online courses which students buy and follow at their own pace.

Pros

  • Once you’ve completed your course, this can be a great form of passive income, leaving you free to do other projects.

Cons

  • If the information in your chosen field has a tendency to change, you will need to make alterations to your course.
  • It may take you some time to make money from your online course. You will not get paid while you’re creating it, and it can take a while to market and build up a good reputation.

27. Become a YouTuber

Some of the top YouTubers are worth millions. Fancy the idea of starring in your own programme? Teaching others a skill or craft you have, vlogging about your travel adventures, making comedy videos – you have plenty of choice as to what kind of channel to start.

Pros

  • It’s fun! If you’re making videos about something you enjoy, work can feel like play.
  • You can learn lots of new skills, such as video editing, marketing, and so on. This could potentially open up other avenues for you.

Cons

  • Certain areas, such as beauty and gaming, are totally saturated, and unless you have your own special angle, it can be difficult to make money this way.
  • It can take a long time to build up a following (and therefore generate any revenue). You may need to learn other skills, such as SEO, to get your channel and videos to come up in search results.

28. Start a Fundraising Business

Charities are constantly seeking funding, as this may come in the form of grants (see #20), but also funds can come from a whole range of courses, like wealthy benefactors. It’s your job to try and convince these other sources to part with their money for a good cause.

Pros

  • You can work in the areas that are closest to your heart, such as children’s charities or environmental organisations.
  • You will get to meet and talk to some interesting people.

Cons

  • You may need to start by working for free. Until you have a good reputation, charities may be unwilling to pay for your efforts as it’s too risky for them.
  • When you start earning money, you need to try to set a price that is reasonable for what you do, but not so high that charities will be negatively impacted, or turn you down.

29. Start a Graphic Design Company

The scope of a graphic designer is pretty huge. They deal with the visual elements on posters, packaging, in advertising, and can work in tons of different domains.

Pros

  • If you’re drawn towards the visual arts, this is a fantastic way of marrying your passions with a money-making business.
  • Given the vast range of different areas a graphic designer can work in, you can find your specialisation and focus on succeeding in your chosen field.

Cons

  • If you don’t have a degree in graphic design, you will need a strong portfolio to prove your worth, which can take some time to build.
  • You will need to pay for the tools and programmes you use yourself instead of having an employer pay for them.

30. Start a Logo Design Business

You could see this a very specific type of graphic design job, but one that requires a different skillset (namely, marketing and business acumen). Every business worth its salt has a well-designed logo. Turning your artistic hand to this coveted skill is a shrewd business move.

Pros

  • There is plenty of work for a designer who deals with logos.

Cons

  • It may look small, but a logo has a lot of different functions. It’s essential that you do well-planned research into the company, their market, and their industry.
  • You will need to get a good grounding in marketing principles to do a good job.

31. Become a Freelance Data Scientist

Data science is one of the sexy jobs of the 21st century. Data scientists use lots of statistical and technological tools and methods to make meaning out of data. Bringing a huge amount of value to companies that have data, but don’t know what to make of it.

Pros

  • Data science is in serious demand. If you become a skilled data scientist, you definitely won’t struggle for work.
  • Companies need ‘em, so they’re willing to stump up the cash. Meaning you stand to make some very decent coin.

Cons

  • It’s an ever-changing field that encompasses a lot of subjects, making it difficult to master. As well as statistical, mathematical and computing knowledge, you also need knowledge of the explicit area that you’re working in, such as banking.

32. Make Money by Becoming an Affiliate Marketing Expert

Affiliate marketing is where you promote or advertise other people’s or company’s products for a fee. It’s a move away from the traditional means of marketing, and a massive proportion of companies are using starting to use it.

Pros

  • You can pick the products that you genuinely believe in, helping those around you by fulfilling their needs.
  • If you already have a bunch of followers on social media or your own site or blog, you have a ready-made audience, and this is something companies seek.

Cons

  • If you don’t have an audience already, you will need to build a following, which can take time.
  • If you do have a following, you will have to be careful with how and what you market. You don’t want to lose followers or readers by seeing as a ‘sell-out’.

33. Become a Music Producer

If you know your way around a computer and you’re a music fan, why not consider learning how to make electronic music?

Pros

  • Chances are, if you make money from making music, you’re making money doing what you love.
  • Commercial organisations need music for advertising, training videos, and a whole range of projects. So, you aren’t restricted to just trying to become the next Daft Punk!

Cons

  • You need to spend a lot of time sitting at the computer by yourself, which can be isolating.
  • It can take a long time to learn to produce music well, and if you make music in a niche genre, it can be difficult to make money from your music.

34. Start a Woodworking Business

It’s a special feeling when you create something out of wood. Furniture is obviously the most common of the wooden products that you might make, but you could also consider creating wooden sculptures or homeware.

Pros

  • You can start small, with a dedicated space in your own home and a few basic tools.
  • You have the option of selling your pieces directly to home users, or selling to businesses.

Cons

  • You need to make sure you have the right ergonomic setup and safety equipment, as there is the potential for injuries or pains and strains.
  • When you want to expand, it can be more costly to purchase additional equipment as well as potentially buy or rent some studio space.

35. Make and Sell Handcrafts

home-business-handcraft

There is a plethora of items you could make at home and sell online (or in physical locations, or both!) for a profit. Clothing, homeware, ornaments, jewellery, accessories – you name it!

Pros

  • This has great potential for turning a hobby into a business. If you already do some crafting in your spare time, it’s worth considering what pieces you might be able to sell for a profit.

Cons

  • If you make homemade items, it can be difficult to scale up.
  • Some items, for example homemade quilts, take a huge amount of time and materials to make, meaning that it can be difficult to recoup your money for the time you’ve spent.

36. Start a Business Refurbishing Old Furniture

Upcycling is all the rage these days, so if you enjoy working with your hands, you could make money-saving old furniture that might otherwise end up at the tip.

Pros

  • You can feel good about helping the environment by giving old furniture a new lease of life.
  • Sustainable furniture is really popular at the moment, so this is a great time to start such a venture.

Cons

  • You will need to pick up some carpentry knowledge to make sure that you do a top-notch job. You don’t want your customers slipping a disc if your chair legs fall off!

37. Start Your Own Knitwear Business

In the UK, there is a high demand for winter woollies when it starts to get nippy outside. Could it be time to get those needles clicking and start making some fuzzy items to keep people warm?

Pros

  • The start-up costs are low. All you need to get going is a supply of wool and the right knitting needles.
  • Wool in the UK can be sourced sustainably – and sustainability is a trend you can capitalise on.

Cons

  • You will have to plan for seasonal demand. Most of your customers will be coming to you from autumn to spring.
  • You may have to invest in a knitting machine if you want to scale up.

38. Start a Holiday Lets Business

Okay, so renting out your spare room isn’t really a business, but you can make a profit from it, and put the capital towards investing in another property.

Pros

  • If you have enough space, you can refurb part of your house, for example a garage or outhouse, to include a bathroom and kitchen. These ‘private’ lets can bring you a much better fee compared to a spare room.
  • If you have a space with a private entrance, you don’t have to have a stranger living in your home.

Cons

  • You may have to deal with difficult guests, and there are aspects such as cleaning and late arrivals that may take you more time than you’d anticipated.

39. Start a Bed & Breakfast

In the days before Airbnb, there was the traditional bed n’ breakfast. If you’re the host with the most (no gender stereotyping here!), make a mean brekkie, and think that you could turn your home into a holiday destination, consider running a traditional B&B.

Pros

  • If you are a people person, you can enjoy meeting travellers and tourists from all over the world.
  • There are plenty of online platforms to help with promotion and booking for the modern B&B host.

Cons

  • Bed & breakfasts often see seasonal trade, which could make it difficult in the winter months.
  • If you don’t live somewhere that gets a lot of tourists, it could be more challenging to get guests to come to stay.

40. Airbnb Experiences

Airbnb now has an ‘experiences’ feature. The idea of this is that locals provide a unique experience of their local area that you wouldn’t get from a traditional tour. If you can offer something different – from a pub crawl, to mural painting, to taking guests to an underground jazz club – you may be able to make a good living out of it.

Pros

  • Using the Airbnb platform is a great way to get your experiences out there without having to invest in marketing.
  • You can meet people from all over the world.

Cons

  • You will need to compete with some of the bigger tour companies.
  • Unless you carry out a social impact experience, Airbnb charges 20% of your fee.

41. Become a Local Tour Guide

Bike tours, walking tours, beer tasting tours, food tours, boat tours, ghost tours. These are just some of the popular options. If your village, town or city has a decent supply of visitors, chances are that they’ll want to see the place while they’re there. Could you help them out (and line your pockets while you’re at it)?

Pros

  • You’ll get to meet people from all over the world. And if you stay in touch, they might be able to give you the inside tip on where they live.
  • You can show off everything you love about your hometown.

Cons

  • You’re like to need insurance to cover your guests while they are on your tours. The price of this can vary depending on the activity.
  • You might find it difficult to sell places on your tours in times of bad weather.

42. Start a Garage/Parking Space Rental Company

There are companies which connect people with drives, garages and parking spaces to other people looking to park at a low cost. Why not start a company in your local area?

Pros

  • You don’t need to make any big purchases to get started. Why not start with your own driveway and approach your neighbors?

Cons

  • It may take you some time to build a viable business out of this.
  • There are already car parking companies on the market, so you will have to market yourself well and build a good reputation for yourself.

43. Become a Massage Therapist

Who doesn’t love a relaxing massage? Well, the people who want an aggressive sports massage. But there’s a type of massage for everyone, and someone’s got to give them!

Pros

  • If you have space, you can either offer your services from your own home or visit clients in their homes or workplaces.
  • It’s got the feel-good factor because you’re making people feel great!

Cons

  • Massages may be relaxing for the client, but it can be quite heavy-going on the masseuse, making you prone to repetitive strain and other injuries.
  • If you don’t have space at home, you may need to rent a room, which brings up your overheads.

44. Start an Electronics Repair Business

home-business-electronic-repair

A technical background and a knack for fixing computers or other electrical bits can be turned into a viable business.

Pros

  • Unlike working in IT in a company, you don’t have any of the restrictions and bureaucracy that makes it difficult to do your job properly.
  • You will bring your customers great relief when you return their precious electronics to them in working order.

Cons

  • You will need to have a broad knowledge of all things techy, and keep updating this knowledge to stay ahead as technology changes.

45. Become a Personal Stylist

Do you know what colours, shapes and cuts look good on people? Not all of us are blessed with an eye for style, so we need people like you to help us look our best!

Pros

  • Get good, build up a great reputation, and those with money in their pockets will pay you to make them look fantastic (cue a healthy bank balance for you).

Cons

  • You’ll have more credibility if you have a qualification in fashion or costume design (although it is not essential).

46. Start a Tailoring Business

How many people have great garments hung sadly in their wardrobes that never get worn because they just don’t fit well? Tailors harness the power of scissors (and a few other bits and pieces) to give those clothes a new lease of life.

Pros

  • You’re saving clothes from going in the bin, and therefore reducing their carbon footprint. This is a good marketing angle for your business.
  • The start-up costs are low – equip yourself with some good scissors, needle and thread, and off you go!

Cons

  • This is another job where you can be prone to repetitive strain injuries.
  • New clothes are cheap, so you will need to market yourself well to encourage people to use your services.

47. Start a Childcare Business

Childcare in the UK is expensive, and if you can provide a competitive option that provides peace of mind for parents, this could be a great earner.

Pros

  • There are lots of kids whose parents work, so you have a large target market!
  • If you have kids yourself, this is a great way of making money whilst you care for them.

Cons

  • To sell your services as a legitimate childcare business and not just a babysitter, you will need to earn some extra qualification.
  • You will need to get insurance.

48. Become a Music Teacher

home-business-music-teacher

Are you a guitar hero? A dab hand at the flute? Playing a musical instrument has the potential for being turned into a business if you have teaching skills.

Pros

  • It’s got the pride factor! Seeing your students improve at their chosen instrument is a fulfilling way to spend your time.

Cons

  • You may have to teach children that are being forced to learn an instrument by their parents, so you will need to learn some effective skills for motivating your less willing students.

49. Start a Taxi Company

Working for Uber, Lyft and other ride-hailing services is an option, but it’s not really your own business, and it lacks the personal touch of a local taxi company. Could you find a niche in this industry?

Pros

  • You will find customers in your local area who like consistency and a personal touch. Could you drive older people to their health appointments or businesspeople who need regular trips to the airport?
  • You could find a niche – for example, offering your services as a female driver, long-distance journeys at affordable rates, or providing in-car entertainment.

Cons

  • It could be expensive to set up – you’ll need a car to start.
  • If you decide to work in the evenings, although you’ll get better rates, you may end up with drunk (shouty and possibly sicky) people in your car.

50. Start a Food Delivery Service

The majority of restaurants these days need to deliver food to compete. Some of the bigger services like Uber Eats charge restaurants up to 30% commission. That’s a pretty hefty sum for a small restaurant. Could you help local restaurants and make money at the same time?

Pros

  • There is a gap in the market for moderately priced local delivery services.
  • If you choose to use bicycles or electric cars as your mode of delivery, you could market yourself as an environmentally friendly delivery option.

Cons

  • To grow and work for multiple restaurants, you will need to have other delivery drivers/bikers on board. This may mean starting with an initial investment.

51. Become a Life Coach

Can you help others find direction in their lives? If you’ve had experience in a range of different fields, ever worked in psychology or human resources, or are just super great at giving people life advice, why not consider this as a business?

Pros

  • Anyone can become a life coach – you don’t need a specific qualification.
  • Another feel-good factor business, where you’re helping people to get the most out of their lives.

Cons

  • If you don’t have credentials, it makes take more time to get clients and build your reputation.
  • Because you don’t need a qualification, the competition is high.

52. Become an Interior Designer

Interior designers take the space inside buildings and make them functional, attractive and safe. Clients can either be individuals looking for a designer for their homes, or businesses looking to design offices and other spaces.

Pros

  • Interior design is a growing industry, and with it brings plenty of opportunities for the savvy designer.
  • You can learn a lot about different fields, as well as get a handle on some pretty cool technology, such as AutoCAD.

Cons

  • It’s not as easy as it might seem – you need to know about architecture, building regulations, ergonomics and more. So get studying!

53. Start a Courier Business

Some of the bigger courier companies charge high prices for their courier services. Could you provide these at a lower cost?

Pros

  • Lots of the big companies offer next-day delivery, so if you can deliver on the same day, you become instantly more appealing to the sender in a hurry.
  • If you specialise (such as transporting flowers or biological samples), you could carve out a niche that brings you plenty of work.

Cons

  • To beat the big guys, you may need to deliver at all times of the day and possibly overnight.
  • If you don’t already have a vehicle, you will need to cough up for one. You’ll also need to pay for insurance.

54. Become a Green Consultant for Businesses

More and more companies are looking to reduce their carbon footprint and looking for someone passionate and knowledgeable to help them make positive changes towards sustainability. Could this be you?

Pros

  • Another job where you can give yourself a round of applause in the mirror (maybe check nobody’s looking first). Helping to save the planet whilst plumping up your bank account is a pretty good deal!

Cons

  • You are likely to need some training and certification, which may cost you money.
  • You will need to stay on top of regulations so that you’re providing your clients with the most up-to-date advice.

55. Start a Dog Walking Business

home-business-dog-walking

One for the dog lovers amongst us! For people in full-time employment who want or own a dog, having a trusted dog walker is essential.

Pros

  • There are no setup costs, and you can get going pretty quickly by rounding up your neighbourhood pups (with their owner’s permission, of course).
  • You get to spend your day outdoors with your new fluffy friends!

Cons

  • The going rate is on the low side, so you may need to walk a whole pack at a time!
  • It’s probably worth getting training and insurance in case of any mishaps.

56. Become a Freelance Gardener

Having a well looked after garden and working full-time can be difficult to balance for a lot of people. Green-fingered entrepreneurs have the chance to meet this need for people in their local area.

Pros

  • Once you get a client, they’re likely to be your client for life (well, at least the long term) because gardens need maintenance.
  • It doubles up as your daily exercise.

Cons

  • The rate for gardening can be on the low side (although if you get a qualification, this can help boost your pay).
  • Winter is going to be a slow season for you, so you will need to balance your work throughout the year.

57. Become a Private or Personal Chef

Busy professionals or families who are short on time often enlist the help of a personal chef to prepare nutritious meals for them. If you’ve got a good understanding of a healthy diet and you’re handy in the kitchen, this could be one to pursue.

Pros

  • You get to be creative and keep your clients happy and healthy, too.
  • You have the flexibility to work for lots of different clients, or just one, such as a family.

Cons

  • You’re likely to work outside of standard office hours, such as early mornings or evenings.
  • It’s vital that you know about food safety, so it’s worthwhile getting trained in this area.

58. Start a Pet Sitting Business

Calling all animal lovers! Get paid to enjoy the company of your fluffy friends. You can sit for animals in your own home, or visit the homes of your clients.

Pros

  • Sometimes, free food and accommodation is included with your job, so if you don’t have to be at home, this could be an additional financial benefit.
  • There is always a need for pet sitters, and some charge a lot of money, so you could get lots of clients by offering your services at affordable prices.

Cons

  • Sometimes things go wrong. It’s pretty horrible to have to let one of your clients know that their beloved pet has passed away.

59. Become a Personal Trainer

home-business-fitness-trainer

Personal Trainers have a passion for fitness and helping others. If both of these sounds like you, working as a freelance PT could be the business for you.

Pros

  • There’s nothing quite like seeing your clients go from being unfit to getting in shape and feeling great!
  • You have the flexibility to work where you want. Beach, park, gym, or your own space at home.

Cons

  • If you want to gain well-paying clients, you will need to gain a qualification in personal training.

60. Start a Junk Removal Business

Not everyone wants to go to the bother of getting a skip if they have some old furniture to get rid of. With a decent-sized vehicle, you could provide a valuable service.

Pros

  • You can donate stuff that’s still good to charities (another pat on the back job).
  • You can team up with furniture upcyclers!

Cons

  • You have to be careful lifting, and you will be prone to injury if you’re shuffling big pieces of furniture around all day.
  • Your vehicle insurance will go up if you use it for business purposes.

61. Start a Cleaning Business

Cleaners are always in demand, and if you’re reliable and good at it, you could see yourself turning a good profit in no time.

Pros

  • The setup costs are low. They’re even lower if your clients provide the cleaning equipment (hoovers, mops, and so on).

Cons

  • The pay is not the highest, although you could start to make more money if you expand and employ more staff.

62. Become a Pub quiz master

Like the sound of your own voice? Think you can put together an interesting and challenging quiz for your local boozer? Loads of pubs in Britain are in need of charismatic quiz masters.

Pros

  • You’ll never be bored, in between finding out interesting information for your quizzes and dealing with local quiz goers.
  • You can get a decent hourly rate (although you will be limited to how many quizzes you can do in a day).

Cons

  • Lots of pubs need you to bring your own equipment, so you might have to invest in a mic and PA speaker. You then need to be able to transport the speaker.
  • This will be all evening and weekend work – you’re unlikely to find any pub quizzes happening in the morning!

63. Start a Yoga or Pilates Business

Yoga is hot, hot, hot (sometimes literally). There are loads of things to love about yoga and Pilates, and if you’re a fan and have been doing it for a few years, you could train as an instructor.

Pros

  • Yoga and Pilates are seriously popular, meaning that there are plenty of opportunities for skilled teachers.
  • The pay is good, especially if you give group lessons.

Cons

  • For bigger classes, you will need a dedicated space and you may need special equipment for each of your students.
  • You will need special training.

64. Start a Painting and Decorating Business

Many people do not have the time, skill, or inclination to do their own home decorating, and hire the services of an expert painter. If you don’t mind being up a ladder and you look great in a pair of overalls, this is your jam.

Pros

  • If you get hooked up with an interior designer, this could be a real boost to your business.
  • It’s not hugely expensive to get started.

Cons

  • This is another job where you could be affected physically, be it from paint fumes or back pain and strain.

65. Become a DJ

DJing used to be a seriously pricey endeavour back in the days of vinyl. In today’s world, DJing is much easier to break into, both in terms of the cost of building up a music collection and learning how to mix using digital equipment.

Pros

  • DJs for corporate events and weddings can make a decent amount of money.

Cons

  • If you DJ a specific niche, it can be harder to get people to pay you properly. Lots of promoters will try to have you play for free for exposure.
  • Being a professional DJ is a job that comes hand in hand with working unsociable hours.

66. Become a Freelance Party Planner

home-business-party-planner

Social butterfly? Know how to throw a banging party? Why not turn your superstar skills into a business and plan other people’s parties for them?

Pros

  • Pulling off a successful party for your client is going to give you some serious job satisfaction.
  • It’s a growing market so you are likely to find work.

Cons

  • It can sometimes be hard to balance what a client wants with their budget, so you need to be an expert in expectation management.
  • It may be stressful if you have a lot of elements to coordinate, such as venue hire, a DJ, catering, and so on. You need good problem-solving skills in case anything doesn’t go to plan.

67. Start a Car Valeting Business

A quick whizz through the car wash is not going to cut it for the businessperson who needs to transport their client, or the taxi driver doing airport runs. They need their cars to look good, inside and out.

Pros

  • The start-up costs are low.
  • If you’re fast, you can make a decent amount. You can also take on staff at relatively cost and expand your business once you start to build up a decent reputation.

Cons

  • You should take out insurance in case anything breaks.
  • You will need to be careful not to injure yourself physically by bending and twisting.

The Round-Up

I bet that got your creative juices flowing!
There are a few things to remember before starting your own home business.

It can take some time to go from zero to hero. You might start by making a small amount in your first month, but with dedication, hard work and a smart business plan, you can find success in one of these ideas.

Remember that although lots of these ideas sound fun, it’s important to maintain a business perspective towards them. Think about the amount of money you might need to invest and the amount of time it’s going to take you week to week whilst you’re getting things moving.

That’s just the beginning.

Once you start making money from one of these business ideas, you can move into a related area. For example, if you are a copywriter, you can start moving into SEO or web design, and becoming an invaluable asset to any client.

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